History
How it was Built
Conservation
Recreation

Save Lake Mead, Enjoy Lake Mead

Since the completion of Hoover Dam in 1938, the Dam and Lake Mead have become vital parts of life in the Southwest. Lake Mead and Hoover Dam provide much needed power and water to communities throughout Arizona, California and Nevada.

Save Lake Mead has a goal of becoming a trusted source of information, news and encouragement to conserve resources, not just locally here in the Southwest, but throughout the United States. We feel strongly that the more you know and understand about Lake Mead, the more passionate that you’ll be about conserving water, electricity and our other natural resources. We also think that you’ll want to visit Hoover Dam, Lake Mead and the surrounding area. 

Herbert Hoover was a great conservationist prior to becoming President. It is only natural that we share his passion for conserving our natural resources, so we can put them to use in the best possible ways. Keep Lake Mead as a vital resource, so our future generations can enjoy its benefits, just as we have over the past seventy years.

Finally, throughout this site you’ll find numerous opportunities for activities and adventures in and around Lake Mead, most at little or no cost. Even with all that you will find here, it is likely that we’ve missed some. When you notice something that we’ve missed, please let us know about it. We’ll check it out.

Get out and Enjoy Lake Mead and we’ll bet that you want to Save Lake Mead!

 

News

Grants Target Salt Control in Colorado River
Ami Joi O'Donoghue - Deseret News
August 19, 2009

Legislation Could Change How Valley Uses Water
The Desert Sun
August 19, 2009

Drought Requires Community to Pursue All of its Options
Steve Sisolak - Las Vegas Sun - Guest Column
August 19, 2009

MORE NEWS...

Archives

Moab Uranium Tailings May Threaten Colorado River
Aaron Vaughn - Fox 13, Moab Utah
June 17, 2009

Southern California Water Agency to Cut Supplies by 10%
Dettina Boxall - Los Angeles Times
April 15, 2009

Lake Mead Could Go Dry by 2021
Scripps Institution - UCSD
Feb. 12, 2008